Are the Twelve Tribes Racist?

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John Stringer answers the question at the Cambridge Press Conference

According to the New York Post, we of the Twelve Tribes teach racism. We do not teach racism. I consider myself more than qualified to speak on that issue, being black, and having been born and reared in the South.

The origins of the Twelve Tribes are in the South where it is unheard of that blacks and whites would live together. Yet, we in the Twelve Tribes have lived together for nearly thirty years.

Our teachings make it crystal clear that the walls of hostility are broken down between the races, in the Son of God. This, for us, is more than mere doctrine — it’s reality.

The reality is that blacks function in responsible positions in every aspect of our communities. There are black elders, black apostles, black heads of households, black teachers, as well as whites. Race is not, nor has it ever been, an issue in the Twelve Tribes.

The teachings of the Twelve Tribes accord my race with much honor and generate a high degree of self-esteem and worth. This is not racism.

Racism is a definite problem in society at large. We make no bones about the issue; and it is quite clear that affirmative action, reparations, and crying “victim” are not the solutions to this problem. The affects of such measures have proven to be quite the contrary.

We find ourselves in a time when the very foundations of this country are in jeopardy. One of the most threatening factors to the stability of our country is the polarization of the two races — blacks and whites.

The teachings of the Twelve Tribes address this and many other problems and provide definite and working solutions, within an environment based on the clear teachings of the Son of God. Our children are learning to be responsible, making every effort to put to positive use the endowments that God has given us.

The statement in the New York Post that blacks will be saved only by their submission to whites is taken totally out of context and has no application within the Twelve Tribes, where blacks are saved like anyone else — by the blood of the Son of God. So what then was the context of that statement?

It was directed to our society at large — the present social order, where every other minority has been able to adapt and build within the framework of American society. They have appreciated the opportunities and have taken advantage of them. However our race is becoming increasingly known for its self-destructive behavior.

Polarization and rage are not solutions. The only way to save our race is that we would submit to reason and responsibility, just as all the other minorities who are thriving and are not destroying or exploiting their own people. There has to be mutual submission on all sides for any society to survive.

The conclusion of the quote and teaching that the New York Post took out of context says this: “Slavery is over for those who believe and come into Messiah, but it is not over for those outside Messiah.”

~ John Stringer